F.A.Q

Are ESE Coffee pods compatible with any coffee machines?

ESE Coffee pods are only compatible with ESE 44 mm pod machines with a bar pressure of +15 

Do the Lavazza Modo Mio, Blue & Point (compatible) capsules work in any machine?

These capsules are designed to work with some machines except A.E.G as these machines ONLY use original capsules.
Please read product description for full details or contact sales@italiancoffeestore.com with your question

Do you accept returns?

Returns Policy
We do not refund or exchange items ordered in error  or if the blend is not to your taste,customers can return it at their own postage cost.
We have a free sample pack (To "try before you buy") to ensure you are happy with your chosen blend.
If on receipt you find the item is damaged during delivery, or any other fault then a replacement/refund will be offered.
If you have any questions then please feel free to email us and we will be happy to help you.
Please contact us via contact page.

Italian Coffee Store Team

Can I collect my order from you?

Yes you can, but please contact us with an estimated collection day/date

We are open Monday to Friday 09:00 to 17:00 and Saturday 09:00 to 13:00 but we can make exceptions if necessary

Do you provide samples?

We can provide free sample packs (one per household) and only charge P&P costs
Please contact us for the shipping costs to other destinations outside of the UK before you purchase.

We offer sample packs of;

  • 44 mm ESE pods
The pack contains 6 of our most  popular blends or if you contact us, you can choose which varieties you want to try.

  • Compatible capsules for Lavazza Modo Mio, Blue and Point.
Please read product description for full details.

  • Coffee Beans





Which grind is suitable for my coffee maker?


Coffee Grinding Guide
The machine and grind play a huge part in the success of obtaining the perfect cup of coffee.
The below table suggests the best grind for your type of brewing process. If your grinder doesn’t have settings then you will need to experiment to achieve the right fineness or coarseness.
Machine TypeGrindDescription
EspressoExtra FineFiner than sugar but not powdered, grains still visible
Moka PotFineSmooth to the touch, slightly finer than table salt
PercolatorCoarseHeavy grained like sea salt
French PressCoarseHeavy grained like sea salt
Drip Flat Bottom FilterMediumGritty like coarse sand
Drip Cone FilterMediumGritty like coarse sand
Vacuum PotCoarseHeavy grained like sea salt
We hope this guide helps you with the correct technique to enjoy your coffee



Coffee Basics: The Difference Between Arabica and Robusta

The two varieties differ in taste, growing conditions, price. Arabica beans tend to have a sweeter, softer taste, with tones of sugar, fruit, and berries. Their acidity is higher, with that winey taste that characterizes coffee with excellent acidity.
Robusta, however, has a stronger, harsher taste, with a grain-like overtone and peanutty aftertaste. They contain twice as much caffeine as Arabica beans, and they are generally considered to be of inferior quality compared to Arabica. Some robustas, however, are of high quality and valued especially in espressos for their deep flavor and good crema.
Robustas, however, are easier to grow. They can grow at lower altitutes than Arabicas, and they are less vulnerable to pests and weather conditions. They produce fruit much more quickly than the Arabicas, which need several years to come to maturity, and they yield more crop per tree.
Robusta is grown exclusively in the Eastern Hemisphere, primarily in Africa and Indonesia. Arabica is also grown in Africa and Papua New Guinea, but it’s grown dominantly in Latin America. Colombia only produces Arabica beans. Some countries, like Brazil and India, produce both.
 Arabica, then, ends up being pricier, of course. Most supermarket coffee is exclusively robusta, and instant and cheap ground coffees are certainly robusta. You can still find Arabica in the grocery store, but just because it’s labeled Arabica does not mean it’s of high quality.
Ultimately it’s a question of personal taste. Some all-arabica blends are too high and floral for us; some of the rich, dark harshness of robusta can be a good thing in a blend. Just remember that robusta has twice as much caffeine as arabica, too, when choosing a coffee blend. If you want to skip most of the caffeine, see our tips for choosing decaf coffee for our suggestions on coffee blends and origins.